Poster

Type of Information

Text and graphics. The graphics are important – a text-only poster will look dull and will probably be ignored by your potential readership.

Procedure

  1. Decide what text you want on your poster. Reduce it to the bare minimum – the larger the text size the more likely it is to be read.
  2. Decide what graphic elements to include: these need to be attractive or striking as well as relevant to the subject matter.
  3. Decide whether you are able to design and produce the poster yourself, or require assistance. If the latter, supply the relevant components to your contact.
  4. Finally, you need to decide how large the poster is to be, its orientation (portrait or landscape) and how many copies you want.
    If you want the poster to be displayed on the Greenbank church premises – for this, portrait orientation is easier than landscape – have a conversation with the Administrator first.
    The Church office can produce coloured A4 or A3 prints, but for larger than that (e.g. A2 or A1), you will need to use a copy-shop.

Notice required

There are two stages to the production of a poster: 1) designing it; 2) getting it printed. The design can take up to a week or longer, depending on the availability of those involved. The printing can be done in a day or so, although larger formats, where a copy-shop is used, might take longer.

Other comments

You must not put up posters yourself: give them to the Administrator and ask her to do it.

Once the event or activity has passed, ask the Administrator to take down the poster(s).

A basic service is offered in poster design. The design process is considerably accelerated if it is email-based.

If the poster is being printed out of house, you will have to pay for it.

Contacts

John Murison (design assistance)
Ginny Johnston (office printing)

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Printer Printable Version